All posts by The Experimental Gourmand

#Pie Day with #UpSouthCookbook’s Buttermilk Pie

Buttermilk Pie in Pie PanButtermilk Pie

I’ve been waiting for a while for just the right moment to post about this recipe. #PieDay seems like an appropriate time, donchathink?  This custard-like, fragrant concoction is a Southern staple, and I’d heard about it for years, although my mother didn’t make this kind of sweet really ever.  For all the desserts I’ve made, I’d also never tried my hand at this one until Nicole Taylor (aka Food Culturist) asked if I’d recipe test it for her Up South Cookbook last year.  Now, I’m hooked on it and can think of all sorts of events at which it would be perfect to bring to the table.

Buttermilk Pie in Tart Pan

Buttermilk Pie in tart form

The original pie in the photo that leads off this post found an audience at a shiva for a friend’s father.  The creamy, cool interior and flakey crust was admired and devoured by the assembled guests.  The photo at the top of this paragraph was a bit of a re-creation on my part.  For the annual #PieParty that is put together by a couple of fellow NYC food bloggers, I swapped out the pie plate for a tart pan and let it cook a tiny bit longer for some more color and a brûlée effect.  One of the chefs at our host location, the Institute of Culinary Education, happily consumed the few leftovers that remained, calling it one of the best baked goods he’d ever eaten.

UpSouth Cookbook

 Up South Cookbook

For my next cooking adventure with this recipe, I think I’m going to morph it even more and make tartelettes.  I have this great Nordic Ware pan that I’ve used to make mini crostate that I think will work out really well.  Nicole includes the pie crust recipe as well in her cookbook; it’s one that is super easy to pull together.  I’ll likely double that and make one batch of the filling, with its scent of cardamom, nutmeg, and vanilla that casts a lovely, warming perfume as it bakes.  That way, more guests can enjoy this taste of the South and of the regional hospitality that goes along with a slice of pie.

Kitchen Witch Tip:

Use the best-quality, full-fat buttermilk in this recipe.  It is so worth the end result to spend that bit of extra time and money to track it down.  In the NYC area, you can find Five Acre Farms products or visit the Union Square Greenmarket and pick up some from Tonje’s Farm Dairy.  

Food & Drink Events and Conferences for 2016

Food Styling prop tableFood Styling Workshop at Eat, Write, Retreat 2012

For several years now, I’ve hosted pages on this website of NYC Food & Drink Events as well as one featuring Food & Drink Conferences. Each of these is updated on a rolling basis, so that the information is as current as I can keep it, given when events and conferences are posted and when my schedule allows me to spend a few hours at the computer at home working on these pages.  With some delay, allowing me to relax from a hectic 2015 year-end, here are links to the pages updated for 2016:

NYC Food & Drink Events (updated continuously throughout the year, with the current month as the lead)

Food & Drink Conferences (updated throughout the year)

Here’s a link to a post that I wrote in 2013 about some of my favorite conferences from 2012, many of which are also being held in 2016.  I also list a few of my reasons for attending conferences and what you can gain from participating in them.  Although I might not be attending as many of these events as I have in past years, I still think that they are a valuable personal and professional resource.  My hope is that one day my budget for taking part in them will come back so that I can go to them once again.  In the meantime, I look forward to hearing about everyone else’s adventures on the conference and event circuit.

Buon appetito!

Dinosaurs Bake Biscuits for #Dinovember

1 - Dinosaurs set up mise en placeT-Rex explains that setting up the ingredients beforehand makes it faster to get the biscuits done

Sometime last year, I bumped into the Facebook page for Dinovember. It might have been around Christmastime, when I was looking for a present for my dinosaur-obsessed nephew. It was right after Dinovember had passed, and I was captivated by the creativity of the originators of this month-long activity as well as by the responses of their ardent followers.

2 - Pour in flourVelociraptor and Dilophosaurus pour in the flour

This year, I said that I was going to take part in the adventure. It reminds me so much of what my mother used to do with us kids: give us whatever materials were lying around and let us be as creative as we wanted to be. Inevitably, with brothers, this turned into sword fighting with craft paper tubes (well, until they snapped in half) and turning wiffle bats into lightsabres.

3 - measures out the saltAnkylosaurus measures out a bit too much salt

Blankets became capes, worn while running around the house singing the Batman and Robin theme song (reruns were a snow day tv treat). Almost anything, including leaves from the magnolia tree in the front yard, could be a Star Trek communicator or a phaser, depending upon the mood and the storyline that we would have made up.

3 - Tears foil from new tin of baking powderVelociraptor figures the easiest way to open the new tin of baking powder is just to rip the foil with his teeth

When I visit my nephews and nieces, they have tons of toys and games to choose from. They also seem equally adept at organizing the vast collection of Fisher Price people, animals, and gear that my parents accumulated over the decades and in creating their own worlds with them. For me, Dinovember is a chance to re-capture some of that whimsy which which I grew up, and to share it with the little (and not-so-little) ones in my life.

4 - tall enough to reach baking sodaBrachiosaurus is the only one tall enough to measure the baking soda

This year, after way too much Halloween candy, it seems like the dinosaurs in my home wanted to get off on the right foot (paw?) by making buttermilk biscuits from scratch from a recipe I’d posted on this website a few years ago. They seemed to have learned something from when I was in culinary school because they not only prepared a mise en place before getting started, they also cleaned up after themselves.

5 - work together to mix dry ingredientsVelociraptor and Dilophosaurus mix together the dry ingredients

The biscuit recipe is one that I’ve used before from Thibeault’s Table.  I’ve made these biscuits dozens of times.  They are also perfect to bake up a big batch and to freeze to keep on hand.  As I had leftover buttermilk from a pie that I’d made from The Up South Cookbook for #PiePartyICE hanging out in the fridge, I’m really glad that the dinosaurs saw fit to use it up making biscuits for Sunday brunch.

6 - Stegosaurus jumps in to helpStegosaurus decides to help out mixing the butter into the flour

This biscuit recipe in a slightly different format, adding chives, sharp cheddar cheese, a bit of dry mustard, and a kick of cayenne pepper, are the ideal appetizer to bring to holiday party, which I’ve done several times.  They are the basis for my Ham Biscuits that I’ve made for many gatherings and which are always a huge hit.  I’m wondering if I can convince the dinosaurs to make another batch!

7 - Makes a well for the liquidAnkylosaurus makes a well for the liquid

8 - Brachiosaurus pours in the buttermilkBrachiosaurus wonders if it would be rude to bathe in the buttermilk

9 - Cut out the biscuitsIf we all work together, this will go much faster!

10 - Ready for the ovenT-Rex asks if they should each mark their biscuits before they are baked

11 - Stegosaurus & Brachiosaurus confer on clean-upStegosaurus and Apatosaurus confer on how to clean up the biscuit-making mess

12 - Dinosaurs clean the dishesEveryone chips in to lend a hand with washing the dishes

13 - Hot biscuits from the ovenIt’s almost too much to have to wait for the biscuits to cool

14 - what to spread on the biscuitsButter, jam, honey or everything?  The dinosaurs are divided on what to put on the biscuits

Post15 - everyone gets their favoriteFinally, a decision is reached to put honey on one half and jam on the other

Buon appetito!

The Passing of a Food-Loving Friend

For months now, I’ve been meaning to put up a post to explain the extra-long hiatus on which the blog portion of this website has been.  I’ve been updating the NYC Food & Drink Events page and the Food & Drink Conferences page, but I haven’t pulled out the computer to do any other longer-form content.  Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter accounts have been the primary way to keep up with my food and drink adventures in the city.  Since moving to working in the culinary industry full-time several years ago, instead of just writing about it, long vacations have been hard to come by, as have been all those extra hours I’d spend cataloging photos and writing posts.  I’d hoped to catch up on posting (and even to write the mea culpa post about not posting) over this holiday weekend.

Gorgeous Yorkshire PuddingYorkshire Pudding, a part of my family’s annual holiday dinner with Roast Beef & Horseradish Sauce, recipes which my friend liked so much she used it at her holiday table, as well

Instead, I have to write about one of the saddest, most upsetting pieces of news I’ve ever received.  On Wednesday evening, I had a call from a friend to inform me that another very good friend of ours had passed away suddenly and without warning.  This person was one of the biggest champions and supporters that I had for migrating my career path into a culinary direction and of this blog, which she shared often on her own social media streams.  She was my foodie wing-person trekking to markets, food fairs, restaurants, wine bars, pubs, all kinds of places just to check out what was going on in the city.  She kept probably at least as keen an eye on the NYC food scene as anyone in the media or blogging world did, and she was always my “outside the industry” / civilian food-lover checkpoint for any new fad or idea or gourmet, artisan, locally-sourced something-or-other. Chocolate-Pistachio Biscotti 2

Chocolate-Pistachio Biscotti, from a friend’s annual New Year’s Day Party, which we both attended this year

Out of respect for her family’s privacy, and, in some ways, my own as well, I will not post her name.  We, her friends, are still stunned and at a loss to understand how we will never see her again at one of our parties, a hollowed-out bread bowl filled with Spinach-Artichoke Dip or a plate of Pickled Shrimp (from some Junior League Cookbook) in hand.  She was always a fan of the culinary classics and loved entertaining and get-togethers, bringing her friends together just to enjoy being around each other.  She’d taste tested so many recipes and is woven into so many posts on this website, that I’m not sure that I can even link to all the stories on these pages that include her.  Her insights and feedback were invaluable.  We didn’t always see eye-to-eye, but we could agree to disagree on what we liked and didn’t like food-wise and in other areas.

SmorgasburgSmorgasburg, just one of the many food markets that we explored together, along with Hester Street, New Amsterdam, the Brooklyn Flea, and others

This news is so fresh that it’s still really, really difficult to believe that we’re not bantering back-and-forth about the Peas in Guacamole brouhaha that was in the NY Times this week.  I can’t imagine that we’re not at this moment trading phone calls and texts about how and where we’re going to coordinate watching tomorrow’s fireworks display over (yay!) the East River, as well as what to consume while watching said spectacle.  I don’t know who is going to traipse around with me to check out the seasonal markets or help me to cross off all the places that we’d made a list of to try, in search of our new favorite eats and drinks place to recommend to friends and family.  We had so many great excursions in this city yet to do and always had more of them to add to our wishlists.

Blood Orange MargaritaBlood Orange Margarita from Colonie, one of our go-to places

Dear, sweet, friend, you are missed so much by all who knew and loved you.  No one can believe that you left your place at our table so soon, never to return.  Last night a small number of us pulled together to share wines and food and to try to comfort each other in our loss.  It was a tiny way that we could start to reflect on what the world will be like without having you there to share our meals, drink various beverages, tell stories, and join in the laughter about everyday life here in NYC.  May you be enjoying a glass of a well-chilled, crisp white wine (or a Rosé, as it is summer) and a plate of plump, briny oysters, one of your favorite combos, wherever you are.  We will wipe away the tears and find an opportunity, soon, to gather together to do the same for you, in your memory and in your honor.

BOE SignBOE Tasting Room, another favorite place to grab a glass of wine, plus a plate of oysters

We were still raving about the now-gone 2007 Merlot that we’d had on one of our first visits there

Porcini-Truffle Risotto

Porcini-Truffle RisottoPorcini-Truffle Risotto

If you don’t like mushrooms and think that truffles smell like feet, you’ll probably want to click away from this post right now.  This dish of Porcini-Truffle Risotto is not for you.  Instead, it is for those who love the earthy, funky aromas and flavors of the funghi that live in the rich soil only to be revealed at that perfect moment of creation.  I’m also posting this now, as another round of wintry weather is threatening to bring a chart-topping snowstorm our way, and this risotto is one of the most comforting ways I can think of to ride out the blizzard that is to come.

Dried porcinisDried porcinis

Fresh porcini mushrooms are even more rare to locate, at least I haven’t seen them for sale very often.  I would see them during the Fall, briefly, very briefly, when I lived in Bologna in the main food market.  A few places also served them with the local pasta during the season.  Mostly, even in Italy, I used them in dried form, like I do here.  The fresh ones had a much milder flavor and were super fragile to handle.  Porcinis are one of the few food items that I think are even better in dried form than in fresh.

IngredientsIngredients

After living in Italy, I found truffle oil, which some chefs like and some think is a culinary scourge.  While I admit that this condiment does get over-used and can completely kill a dish, I also think that it does have its time and place, sometimes.  I’ve waited for the sales that O & Co. has to pick up truffle oil as well as jarred truffles, which I then make into a compound butter.  The rice is Vialone Nano, one of several kinds that can be used for making risotto.  That, I bought at the Mercato Notturno that the Greenmarket had a few months back.  With these few ingredients, plus some homemade vegetable stock that I had in the freezer, I was set to go.

Porcini-Truffle Risotto

Prep Time: about 45 minutes to 1 hour (includes soaking time)

Serving Size: 4 main course or 6 primi piatti

Ingredients:

1 packet Dried Porcini Mushrooms (about 20 grams)

1 tsp. Truffle Butter

1 tsp. Truffle Oil

1 medium Shallot, minced

1 tsp. Kosher Salt

1 c. Risotto Rice

2 1/2 c. Vegetable Stock

1/4 tsp. Black Pepper, freshly ground

1 tsp. Truffle Butter

1/4 c. Grana Padano, freshly grated

Truffle Oil for garnish

1 tsp. Chives, chopped

Assembly:

Re-hydrating porcinisRe-hydrating porcinis

Place dried porcini mushrooms in a shallow bowl.  Pour just enough boiling water over the mushrooms to cover them.  Set aside and let the mushrooms re-hydrate while preparing the rest of the ingredients.  Pour the vegetable stock into a small saucepan and let it come to a low boil.

Shallots cookingShallots cooking

In medium saucepan, melt the butter along with the truffle oil.  Add the minced shallots and cook for about 8-10 minutes, until the shallots are soft and almost translucent.  Season with a pinch of salt.

Adding risotto riceAdding rice

Stir in the rice.  Make sure that each grain is thoroughly coated in the fat from the butter and oil.  Let it cook for about a minute, but do not let it get browned.

Beginning to add stockAdding stock

Pour a ladleful of stock over the rice and stir to make sure that the liquid is incorporated throughout the risotto.  Let the risotto cook over low heat, absorbing the stock.  Once it looks like all the liquid is gone, add another ladleful of stock, taking care not to let the risotto lose so much liquid that it starts to stick to the pan.

Chopped rehydrated porcinisChopped re-hydrated porcinis

While the risotto is cooking, remove the porcini mushrooms from their soaking liquid.  Do not discard the liquid.  Chop the porcinis until they are about the same size as the shallots.  These to do not have to be even pieces, just not really giant-sized ones.

Incorporating porcinisAdding porcinis

When the rice has just about doubled in size, and when, in tasting it, there’s a bit of give but still a chalky element to the risotto, add the porcini mushrooms along with any accumulated liquid from them.  Do not add the soaking liquid.  Stir to incorporate.  Add the black pepper and 1/4 tsp. salt at this point as well.  Continue stirring the risotto and adding more stock until the risotto is on the verge of al dente.

Adding truffle butter and grana padanoAdding truffle butter and cheese

Just as the pasta gets to the al dente state, turn off the heat.  The risotto will continue to cook a bit more even after the heat its off.  Add the remaining butter plus the Grana Padano and stir them into the risotto.  Taste for seasoning.  Add more salt and pepper to taste.

Plated Porcini-Truffle RisottoPorcini-Truffle Risotto

Immediately transfer the risotto to warmed plates.  If desired, drizzle each portion with an extra bit of truffle oil.  Sprinkle the chopped chives on top of the risotto.  Serve right away.

Buon appetito!

International Day of Italian Cuisines (IDIC) 2015

Eggplants on the counterEggplant – a key component of this year’s dish

Today, January 17th, marks the 9th International Day of Italian Cuisines.  This year, Eggplant Parmesan (parmigiana di melanzane) is the highlighted national dish.  As in past years, this is a celebration of Italian heritage and food culture as well as a way of emphasizing that what makes the cuisine of this country held in such high esteem is the attention to detail and quality of ingredients.  For this year’s feature, this is no less true than in past years.  The freshest, meaty eggplant combined with sweet-tart tomato sauce, peppery basil, and creamy mozzarella cheese come together on one plate in this recipe.

Eggplant ParmEggplant Parmesan – from a recipe from Food & Wine

I didn’t really grow up loving eggplant.  My mother actually tried to sneak it into quite a few meals that she fed to our clan, which was quite unsuccessfully received.  I think a few of my siblings still have nightmares about the time she tried to incorporate it into tacos.  Thankfully, I wasn’t around for that one.  Somewhere along the line, however, I tried this marriage of fried vegetables and gooey cheese with rich tomato sauce and fell in love with it.

Tray of Eggplant ParmesanEggplant Parmesan – from Mamma Agata Cooking School

When I lived in Italy, I discovered that this is considered a secondo, or second course, served after the pasta course.  I’m not sure why I would have thought it was a regular first course, but maybe that’s just because I grew up with just eating one course for Italian-style meals.  When I assisted Gennaro of Mamma Agata’s Cooking School a couple of years ago, he gave me several tips on how he prepares his version of parmigiana di melanzane, which I shared in my post about their cooking class.

Eggplant ParmesanServing of Eggplant Parmesan

As with any classic recipe, there are many regional variations.  I have seen recipes that call for dredging the slices in flour and then egg and then breadcrumbs and then fry them.  Some folks just dip them in flour and fry them.  There’s been recipes that call for roasting the eggplant instead of frying it.  Then, there’s the cheese: Parmigiano Reggiano, Grana Padano, mozzarella, mozzarella di bufala or any combination thereof.  Even on the IDIC website, the post about “The Authentic Parmigiana: A Glorious Italian Dish” has several adaptations.

Eggplant Parm sandwichFor the leftovers – an Eggplant Parm Sandwich

The organizers have included a recipe on their website, which recognizes some of these variations but still keeps to a pretty straightforward interpretation of its preparation.  Whatever way you decide to make it, the use of the best and freshest ingredients possible is still the most important way to prepare this dish.  That is in keeping with the letter and the spirit of what the International Day of Italian Cuisines represents.

Buon appetito!

IDIC 2012

IDIC 2014