Tag Archives: beer

Edible Good Beer Event 2018

EGB entry28 Liberty Plaza – site of 2018 Edible Good Beer event

Each year, when summer rolls around, Edible Manhattan puts together its Good Beer event.  This is always a great showcase of local New York breweries as well as dishes from NYC restaurants to go along with them.  Last Thursday, July 19th, for the first time, this gathering was held at 28 Liberty, the former Chase Manhattan Plaza.  The China General Chamber of Commerce was a co-sponsor of the event along with Tsingtao beer and Fosun International (who operates 28 Liberty).  One added activity for this year, was that attendees were able to vote on what beer would be on tap at the newly-opened Manhatta restaurant on the 60th floor of the building.

28 Liberty Plaza

View from the plaza

Breweries came from around the New York City area as well as from Long Island, and there were a few from overseas.  This was a opportunity to sample craft beers as well as more established brands.  As usual, from past Good Beer events, IPAs seemed to be on tap at almost all of the tables.  Ales, Pilsners, Stouts, and Gose were also in supply.  In addition to the beers, were ciders from Doc’s and 1911.  One visible trend was fruit in beer, with passion fruit, mango, grapefruit and other flavor being added to beers to boost flavor and to try to land that extra hook to capture the audience’s taste buds and fandom.  Another trend, which has been becoming more visible is that many of these products are available now in local markets in can form, instead of only on tap or at the tasting rooms.

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Some of the breweries and their beers

My two favorites of the evening were, as comes as no surprise: Ales, as I tend to steer clear of hop-heavy IPAs.  The Pub Ale from Strong Rope Brewery reminded me of many an evening hanging out with friends over a few pints.  This is a great food brew in the classic, crisp bitter style.  The other ale I enjoyed was the more complex, malt forward Driftwood Ale from Montauk Brewing Company, also something that would be a great match with many dishes.  Fortunately, there were also many different foods with which to try to pair them.

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Some of the food options

The restaurants who came out to this event brought some great beer-pairing friendly nibbles.  Noodles by Lucky Pickle Dumpling Co. provided a spicy base layer with which to start the evening.  Pickles by their parent company Jacob’s Pickle and bacon by Maison Pickle provided contrasting tangy, porky, and sweet notes.  Fatty, spicy, hot, sweet seemed to the taste profiles of many of the dishes, minus the mochi by My/Mo Mochi and sweets from JoMart Chocolates.  Pierogies by Baba’s Pierogies had jalapeño, along with a spicy sour cream and lime dip.  The folks at Blue Smoke created another two-bite treat with saltine, pimento cheese, andouille, and a slice of jalapeño.  One of my favorites was the Nasi Lemak from Wok Wok, with layers of coconut rice and curry chicken and a sliced egg garnish.  All of these provided nice pairing options with many of the different styles and profiles of beverages.

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This new event location was ideal for a walk-around tasting, allowing plenty of space for wandering around the tables to pick up a glass of something and a bite of something else.  The tables on the plaza added that extra aspect of this being a place to hang out where groups of friends were getting together to compare notes and share samples.  A live band, plenty of beers, delicious food, and a rare, breezy summer evening made it difficult to say good-bye to this year’s Edible Good Beer festival.

With thanks to Shea Communications for arranging for me to attend this event.  Kronenbourg 1664 Blanc, a wheat beer, was selected by the attendees to be on tap at Manhatta.

“The Dynamic Flavors of Beer – Tasting and Pairing” with John Holl at the 92nd Street Y

The American Craft Beer CookbookCookbook by John Holl

“We were a country founded on beer,” stated John Holl, the author of The American Craft Beer Cookbook at last Thursday’s talk with Kitchen Arts & Letters at the 92nd Street Y: The Dynamic Flavors of Beer – Tasting and Pairing.  The starting point of his mini-seminar was having us taste some of these beers so that we could see the range and nuances of several of the beers currently being brewed in the United States.  In his book, he tries to capture the stories of these and and others being made in this country at the moment and to highlight not only their diversity but also the variety of foods that we are eating with them at this point in time.  “Beer and Food have really come up together,” he told us.

Beers SampledBeers sampled at tasting

Before we delved into the matching up of beer and food, Holl explained to us the proper way to sample a beer.  “You don’t swish and spit.  You taste and swallow,” he said, pointing out the differences between a beer tasting and a wine tasting, noting that there were no dump buckets on the table for us to pour our beers into.  There are who different methods of experiencing the aromas of a beer, he told us.  “The Bloodhound,” where you do quick bursts of sniffing in the fragrance, and the “Drive By,” where you pass the glass back and forth across your nose, taking a deep breath as it goes by.  Just as with wine, mouthfeel plays an important roll in sampling beer as do the aromas and finish.

Food PlateFood plate

The questions he told us to keep in mind when trying the beverages we were tasting that day were: “Would you have it again?” and “Would you have another one after that?”  He also instructed us that the best way to get a beer into a glass was to pour straight down the middle.  Unlike what I, and others, have been taught all of our beer-drinking and -pouring lives, you do want a bit of a head on top of the drink.  It helps to build the aromas.  Here’s a list of the beers that we tried and the pairings that Holl did with them:

Golden ExportGolden Export by Gordon Biersch

This is a “standard American lager,” according to Holl.  It tasted just like the beers of my college years, light, drinkable, best served cold.  One of those beers that goes down smoothly on a hot summer’s day (possibly after mowing the lawn) or after a long shift at work.  It was a doable match with the pretzel on the plate.

Victory FestbierVictory Brewing Festbier

For me, this beer had quite a few dry cider notes, almost a cross between a lager and a cider, but not in a Snakebite kind of way.  (I have memories of those from my time living in the UK just out of college.)  It finished clean on the palate, which was nice with the pretzel that we tried with it, wiping up the saltiness on my tongue.  I could see some really great food pairings as it might play well with dishes with a bit of spice (as well as maybe using it to cook with for a buttery roast chicken.).

Boulevard Brewing Co Wheat BeerBoulevard Brewing Company Wheat Beer

This selection was a light, refreshing beverage, but I have to admit, I’m not generally a fan of wheat beers.  The Manchego that we tasted with it brought out some fruity, clove, and even ripe banana notes, which was kind of intriguing to discover about it.  During the Q&A at the end of the session, Holl pointed out that as it is often served with an orange or lemon wedge, it can also be a good match with briny seafood dishes, a pairing which might just change my mind about these beers.

Great Lakes Brewing Co - Edmund Fitzgerald Porter Great Lakes Brewing Co. Edmund Fitzgerald Porter

I grew up with the lyrics to “The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald,” so I found it interesting that someone had named a beer after that incident.  This was the beer I was most looking forward to sampling all evening, just from a personal standpoint.  I’ve recently gotten into milk stouts and porters, as there are just those times when you really want something more complex and deep – velvety, darkly toasted with chocolate and toffee notes, which, by the way make this a great pairing for creamy desserts, or for the aged Gouda that we had with it that night.  As my friend who was with me said, its aromas reminded her of affogato al caffè.

Smuttynose Finestkind IPASmuttynose Brewing Co. Finestkind IPA

To end the evening, we sampled an IPA with a Maytag blue cheese.  For me, IPAs are intrinsically linked to Indian food.  As Holl pointed out to us, IPA is style that runs the gamut and can go with everything from the aforementioned spicy food to carrot cake.  It was definitely robust enough to handle the blue cheese and made me wonder how it would do with a steak in a gorgonzola sauce (a recipe for which is in his book).  That might be a project to bring some friends together for dinner and a few beers some time soon.  Hopefully, they wouldn’t mind my trying this pairing out on them.

Buon appetito!

Thank you to Kitchen Arts & Letters for inviting me to attend this event.  If you would like to drop by their store (which I encourage all cooks and cookbook lovers to do, as their selection and expertise is amazing), please visit their website for their current hours.  In addition, they are hosting several other food talks in conjunction with their neighbor, the 92nd Street Y.  Those talks can be found on the Y’s website.

Preview of Cook Out NYC with Kimchi-Making Demo by Mama O’s Premium Kimchee

Have you been out to Governors Island yet this year?  If not, here’s another terrific reason to plan a day out of the city (sort of) to check out this bucolic spot just a short ferry ride away from Manhattan and Brooklyn.  Cook Out NYC will be taking place July 7-8 from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  This event will feature delicious dishes prepared by fantastic local chefs, refreshing brews by Sixpoint Brewery, and for all you kimchi lovers, a Spicy Kimchi Eating Contest to be held on Saturday.  I’m pleased to be able to offer you a $5.00 discount on tickets to this event, courtesy the sponsors.  Enter the code “BlogOutNYC” at check-out.

Kheedim Oh of Mama O’s Premium Kimchee

As part of the press launch for this event, several fellow bloggers, local media folks, and I gathered at Jimmy’s No. 43 last night for a kimchi making demonstration by Kheedim Oh, the founder of Mama O’s Premium Kimchee. Both Jimmy and Kheedim met when they each had stands at the New Amsterdam Market.  Kheedim started off by explaining the origins of his four-year-old company.  After relocating from Maryland, he missed his mother’s kimchi and hadn’t been able to find any store-bought version that stacked up to her homemade one.  After convincing her to teach him how to make it, he would travel to and from New York with coolers full of it.

Ingredients for Kimchi

Not able to eat all of it himself, he offered it to friends who told him that he should be selling it.  A butcher in his Lower East Side neighborhood fell in love with it and started to carry it.  Things grew from there, and now his product can be found in many Whole Foods stores in the region as well as at Murray’s Cheese Shop and other specialty food retailers.  He said he goes through about 500 pounds of cabbage a week making kimchi.  He treated us to a brief explanation of how it all comes together:

Explaining how to prep the cabbage for brining – slice it lengthwise

After 24 hours – unbrined (left) vs. brined (right) cabbage

Making the spicy paste – pounding garlic by hand (he did most of this by machine)

Making the spicy paste – slicing ginger

Making the spicy paste – pulverizing ginger

Making the spicy paste – juicing a few limes (with help from the audience)

Making the spicy paste – adding dried red pepper

Making the spicy paste – adding more dried red pepper

Making the spicy paste – oh, let’s just add a little bit more dried red pepper

Spicy Red Pepper Paste

Cutting up the brined cabbage (cut out the core at the bottom and discard it)

Slice a few scallions

Chop up a pile of cilantro

Give it all a good toss together

Guests were able to pack it up to take home with them

My own personal jar of kimchi, ready to go home

Thanks so much to Kheedim for his highly-entertaining demonstration of how to make kimchi.  I’m not sure I’m going to try doing this in my own kitchen, but I’m looking forward to tasting the results of last night’s event when they are ready.  Remember, Cook Out NYC will be taking place July 7-8 from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  There’s a $5.00 discount on tickets to this event when you enter the code “BlogOutNYC” at check-out.  I’ll be there as well, covering this event for my website courtesy of Food Karma Projects.

Buon appetito!